Isometric Contraction During Strength Training Reps

June 4, 2012 by  
Filed under Isometric Exercises

Article by Joseph Holinganneez

Isometric Contraction During Strength Training Reps – Entertainment

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The importance of focusing on control the stress isometrically, at least for just one second, during all of the repetitions of all strength training workouts is just not widely known. This information will bring some awareness to work with the isometric contractile ability of muscles effectively and find faster outcomes. Generally exercisers do not try to control force isometrically at the end of every concentric or eccentric work from the repetitions. Including the well known benefits of doing controlled eccentric work may also be not much recognized to the fitness trainers and physical therapists.

Potential Energy: At the end of every concentric or eccentric work of your repetition, the exerciser must support the load for a minimum of one second to check his capacity to fight to be able load. If your load is held isometrically during each repetition, potential energy is generated (fuel in the body is used to generate potential energy). Inability to hold the load isometrically after few repetitions is most likely the starting point of fatigue and on the subsequent eccentric or concentric work onward, there may be highly likelihood of producing unwanted compensatory movements. Potential energy can be calculated while using the formula P.E = mgh. One example is, if 40 kg is pulled during compound row, and also the load inside machine has got moved up to 50 cm, next the P.E equals 40 kg x 9.8 x 0.5 m (196 joules per repetition). If 10 repetitions are executed, then 1960 joules is expended for performing isometric contraction alone (in addition to the energy expended for concentric and eccentric work).

Crucial joint angles and Isometric contraction: In a few exercises, the joint angle of which the concentric work ends as well as the isometric work is performed becomes effective task. For instance, when bent over row (single arm or double arm) is performed, at the end of shoulder extension, the arm(s) becomes parallel to the ground and the forearms become vertical to the floor, creating a situation for greater gravitational torque. So, more fuel has to be burnt to generate potential energy to counteract greater gravitational torque. Another example may be squat when the thighs become horizontal for the floor at the end of eccentric work, building a chance for greater torque produced by the gravity.

TUT and potential energy: If attention is paid on isometric their hands on the load at the end of every concentric or eccentric work, then a ‘Time Under Tension’ (TUT) of any repetition increases a minimum of by one second.

Analysis required: Physical therapists and Fitness trainers should assess and pay attention to the crucial joint angles for everyone strength training workouts where isometric contraction needs to be performed. Although we’d two simple examples (bent over row and squat), in the exercises like Biceps curls in standing, neither after concentric or eccentric work, crucial angle is available. In this case, the elbow has to be maintained at 90 degrees while lifting or releasing the strain to isometrically prevent greater gravitational torque.

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Joseph Holinganneez



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For more reviews, head on to Nitric Oxide Supplements and Nitric Oxide.












Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines
whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.

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