Improving Your Pull-Ups for the Marines Physical Fitness Test

September 7, 2012 by  
Filed under Pull Ups

Article by Jonathon Hyatt

Improving Your Pull-Ups for the Marines Physical Fitness Test – Health

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Pull-ups are the hardest part of the Marines physical fitness test. Most Marines can get ten or twelve, but hitting that elusive twenty takes carefully-planned training. Whether you’re trying to secure a spot at officer school – or you’re just getting into shape for your next test – follow these tips for your best performance yet.

Train Heavy

When people have a rep goal for a certain exercise, they usually spend way too much time training with light weights. This is true for pull-ups, as well as squats, push-ups, and other calisthenics. Your goal might be to do twenty chins with your bodyweight, but adding extra resistance is what will actually get you there.

If you don’t already have one, find a sturdy chain belt for adding weight. If you have a weighted vest with adjustable poundage, that’ll also work. Dedicate at least half of your training sessions to using heavy weights that only allow you to get six to eight pull-ups. If you get stronger, you’ll be able to do more reps with your bodyweight, as well.

Practice Daily

If you want to become proficient at any exercise, you need to practice it as often as possible. This doesn’t mean that every pull-up session needs to be a gut-busting, all-out effort – it simply means that you should do them every day. In fact, you may even want to set up a portable pull-up bar in your home. Do easy sets of five or ten every time you pass it, and you’ll soon find the movement to be far easier than before.

Hit the Gym

It’s important to do a variety of exercises to strengthen your upper back and biceps – the muscles that do most of the work in the pull-up. Barbell rows, dumbbell rows, and deadlifts are the best movements you can do, and you should focus on constantly lifting heavier weights. Some Marines are quick to write off curls as “non-functional,” but they can also help you squeeze out those last few inches to get your chin over the bar. Bicep work is especially important if you’re going to use an underhand grip in your PFT.

Energize

Make sure you fuel yourself with the right food every time you train or test. Poor nutrition will cause you to lose steam well before you hit twenty pull-ups, even if you’re strong enough to do it. Low-carb diets are great for losing weight, but you need starches and sugars for intense training. Energize with oats, potatoes, and yams for an even keel of energy. Gatorade and other glucose-based sports drinks are good, too – but stay away from table sugar and high fructose corn syrup.

Lose Some Weight

Heavy hitters can sometimes get good scores, but it’s the middleweights and little guys who usually excel at the Marines physical fitness test. To really get good at pull-ups, you’ll need to strike a balance between having enough muscle mass – and not weighing yourself down with extra flab. To get as lean and mean as possible, eat al of your carbs just before and after training. Load up on protein, eat moderate amounts of healthy fat, and stay away from fast food and other junk.

About the Author

Pull-ups are the hardest part of the Marines physical fitness test. Most Marines can get ten or twelve, but hitting that elusive twenty takes carefully-planned training.

Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines
whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.

Jonathon Hyatt



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Pull-ups are the hardest part of the Marines physical fitness test. Most Marines can get ten or twelve, but hitting that elusive twenty takes carefully-planned training.












Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines
whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.

For TShirts strengthproject.spreadshirt.com www.strength-project.com http please visit our website and facebook for more training advice, tips, and discussions. This is the first weeks pull up videos for beginners. If you can already do pull ups, this weeks video is not for you. Make sure you subscribe and for a workout routine for beginners, please go to strength-project.com and in the tutorial section, go to calisthenics and you’ll find pull ups week 1 for beginners. Do these workouts and eventually you WILL get to the point where you can do a pull up.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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